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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the tone of the show, kids. >> finally before we go i would like to talk about googles auto complete feature. if you type "is." the third result is "is daniel tosh gay? "this is what the world needs an answer too. let it go my little monsters. here is what happens when you type in "can you." "can you get pregnant from [beep]? the answer is a big yes. of all forms of pre the most potent and tangiest. if you type in "were there." here is what comes up: were there black people on the titannics? were their white slaves? were their gay presidents? what's wrong with the country, this great questions. let's do this with images. if you type in "probably smells kpwad" what do you think the first picture is? rihanna? i would like to get her stank all over me. if you type in haopbd so many comedians. you get 34 pages of results and i'm not on a single one. that's horse [beep]. maybe i need to get more specific with my search. sexy white comedians named daniel i'm fourth. [laughing] >> so, in conclusion google is garbage and i'm tanging my business to binge. good night. i hope you enjoy all of t
intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> welcome back. quick headlines for you. fda warning that bad botax may be shipped to 350 clinics in the u.s.. rick are you listening? the batches from supply canada drugs are not approved and can't assure the effectiveness or safety. >>> and can you relate to this guy? >> i am mad as hell and not going to take this anymore. >> never . it turrence out if you have a short temper it may help you live longer. people who express anger instead of bottling it in add two years to their lives. >> gretchen: i didn't know if i missed something on the weekend. i don't catch every minute. is this an inside joke. >> you know with botox you cane see the surprise. nothing moves. >> really. >> gretchen:
-- >> there were no other reviews to the "washington post," washington monthly, if you google "strom thurmond's america" you will find some. and you should google it. [laughter] >> what's next? >> i don't know. i'm not sure that i just finished this once i'm still trying to figure it out. [inaudible] >> no, no. thank you all for coming out. it's been a real pleasure. [applause] >> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >> we are here on booktv on c-span2. we want in addition to author elizabeth ames was written a book with steve forbes, "how capitalism will save us: why free people and free markets are the best answer in today's economy." elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal expense, particularly when it comes to economics. >> okay. well, i've been a financial journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and had in my own pr business, and i have also done projects, other communication projects with clients, among them riding, co-authoring books. and basically i have worked wi
as agencies have wide discretion on who gets wiretapped. it includes a foreign group. it may be a google account, where they get information, if it turns out that was an american's account, if they didn't know at the time they were getting domestic intelligence, they said look, you're claiming we're -- not -- at risk, our civil liberties were not at risk, because you have this incredibly robust over sight, should not we have a rough estimate on how many american's communications are getting swept up in this data base, they said we can't do that, the reason we can't do it. it is secret. go to a secret room and read the reason why we can't do this. the public is not allowed to know. he also wanted to bar back door searches. the idea here is, because the authority is so broad they can essentially say we're going to intercept initially all communications between the u.s. and pakistan. and just sort of sift through them later to see what satisfies the criteria for being relevant to a terror investigation. so widen's idea here is look, if this is supposed to be the idea as you keep claiming, s
with a foreign target, which includes a foreign group. so might be a google g-mail account. as long as their purpose is to get information about al qaeda, they can do that, and if it turns out after the fact, that was an american's account, as lock as they din know at the time they were getting domestic communications, which, of course, you wouldn't, it's all legal and they can keep that in an enormous database indefinitely. and widen said, look, you are claiming we are not at risk. the civil liberties aren't at risk, then we shouldn't at bear minimum have some rough estimate of how many americans' communications are getting swept up? and the nfrp sa repeatedly said we can't do that, and the reason why is secret. so go to a secret room and read the reason why we can't do this. the public isn't allowed to know. he also wanted to bar back door searches. the idea, gwagain, because the authority is so broad, they can essentially say we will intercept all communications between the u.s. and yemen or pakistan and sift through them later to see what satisfies the criteria for being relevan
communications or surveillance with a foreign target, which includes a foreign group. so might be a google g-mail account. >>> as long as their purpose is to get information about al qaeda, they can do that. if that turps out after the fact oops it was an american's account. they can keep that in an nor mouse database and wyden said zej sensibly you are claiming our civil liberties aren't at risk because you have a robust oversight. shouldn't we at bare minimum have a rough stes estimate of how many americans communications are getting swept up in this database and the nsa repeatedly said essentially we can't do that and the reason we can't is secret. go to a secret room and read the reason why we can't do this. the public isn't allowed to know. he wanted to bar back door searches. the idea is because the authority is so broad they can essentially say we're just going to intercept, northeast initially all communications between the u.s. and pakistan and sift through them later and see what satisfies the criteria for being relevant to to a terror investigation. wyden's idea is if this is supp
that was there in plain sight, but had not been noticed. if you googled the words "great senate" you'll find nothing other than my book. [laughter] nobody had ever noticed a great senate. certainly there are great senators and great filibusters, but a great senate had never been thought about. the reader reviews said of the book said today's senate is not a very good, but in 1960s and 1970s, we had a great senate. i'm delighted they agreed with me. from about 1963 to 1980, we had a great senate in america was that -- that was in the forefront of everything. from holding president nixon accountable and watergate, every a congressman of the senate. in the middle of that senate was robert c. byrd. by the way, for those of you who want to write a book, having a publisher is a good thing. writing a book looking for a publisher later is not a good thing. i was very fortunate. i publisher said to me, all right, we will let you write the book. it cannot be a memoir. all right. can i pop up in the book occasionally? yeah, twice. the publisher said, it is narrated history. you need to tell a story. ok. i can tell s
, the phone numbers and in some cases, google zoom maps and pictures of the home of the editor of the newspaper and now their home information is out there for all to see. so they are getting considerable blow back as well. >> isn't the concern, i mean, it is not that you and i can go out and finds a gun owner here. but the bad guys can say, there's a gun here we can steal or hey, this home next door doesn't have a gun. >> that is right. it gives them every piece of information they would want to know about who has guns that they could steal, who doesn't, who they can rob, that is what larry pratt of the gun owner's association is concerned about here. you know, we have to monitor this closely to see if there's a crime wave in that area that takes place as a result of this. >> the information is public. they can get it anyway. seems like wow, it's made easy. >> easier and faster. >> yes, as i say, so many issues in this. freedom of the press and gun ownership and all of that. thank you so much. i appreciate it. if you are a fan of the group queen or maybe you like to watch biza
. kwame holman tells us about year-end reflections from social media. >> holman: facebook, twitter, google-- the online giants are providing more authority to online users by using algorithms that gauge their "collective curiosity" to evaluate the year. hari sreenivasan examines the media trend on the rundown. plus, if a headhunter calls, should you answer? employment expert nick korkodilos offers answers to that and other questions on making sense. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on wednesday, we'll have jeff's second story from athens, about how ordinary greeks are coping in tough times. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. i'm gwen ifill. thank you, merry christmas, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this pr
. brain upgrading to a quad-core processor. predictive intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> a flight from long island to tampa took a surprised detour off the runway into the mud. you've got to hear how the pilot broke the news to air traffic controllers. cnn's sandra endo has the story and the recording. >> reporter: candy, a southwest airline departed long island new york this morning, veered off course just seconds after pushing away from the gate. listen to what the pilot told the control tower. >> we just taxied off the taxi way into the grass here. >> repo
there that will let you transfer them over for free. you just need to do a little google search for the program you want to use. i've done it and it works. >> gretchen: all right. clayton, thank you so much for all the answers to those questions and rick for our weather forecast. hopefully you have a safe flight today. and we will be following the fiscal cliff talks tomorrow. and clayton, you'll be hear, right? >> clayton: i will. so send us any of your questions as well and your thoughts. our -- go to our web site for the after the show show. >> gretchen: happy new year, everybody. gregg: fox news alert. powerful winter storm bringing deadly weather. >> oh, wow. that is a tornado. jesus, look at that tornado. it is like two tornados. it is two funnels on the frowned. oh, lord. look at there. wow! look at that. gregg: the storm system that produced those tornados in parts of the south not done yet. now posing a potentially major roadblock for countless holiday travelers. hello, i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. >> i'm patti ann browne in for martha maccallum patti ann: local crews said there is
it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a crisis over raising the debt ceiling. republicans demanded some cuts from congress. they agreed to $1 trillion in cuts, they handed over $1.50 trillion to the super committee. because they failed to come up with a deal that could be approved by congress and the president, those automatic cuts go into effect, $1.20 trillion over 10 years. the first cut will go into effect on january 2 of 2013. host: how are the defense sequestration cuts being applied? are we sure? guest: we are not exactly sure, but the law says that every program and activity must be cut by the same percentage. there may be some flexibility, but the understanding is that you have to go across the board and cut everything by the same amount, estimated to be about 9.4% in the case of the pentagon. host: what is on the table for the pentagon? guest: everything can be
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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